Baseball is Back!

Unknown

 

Dear Reader:

Just in case you didn’t know: it’s baseball season! Last night my San Francisco Giants beat the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 14th inning! Nothing better than a hard-earned victory over your greatest rival.

I was not at the park to share in the moment to moment agony and thrill, but I’ve been there enough to know what it felt like and sounded like. It was cold and loud. I could almost taste the Ghiradelli hot chocolate and hear the chant: BEAT LA!

Just as the fans jumped from their seats and yelled, my husband and I let loose in our living room scaring our dogs. The only thing that is possibly sweeter than warm chocolate is a walk-off home run to BEAT LA! 

There are so many things to love about the game. As a reader and a writer, one of the ideas I love the most about our national past-time is that it seems to be the perfect metaphor for life. None of these ideas are original, but for your benefit (and my pleasure), I’ll expand on the similarities.

-The season is 162 games long. It’s twice a long as basketball which ranks second at 81 games. So, the team that struggles in the beginning may end up World Series champions! We all hope for a long life with plenty of time to realize our dreams.

-It takes a team to win the game. There are all-stars, but, in the end, everyone has a position to play…everyone contributes in some way. I am grateful for my “team” that includes family, friends, neighbors, bloggers and doggies! I couldn’t manage without all of them.

-Hitting a baseball is hard, just as life is hard. Even the best players strike out…a lot! In 2017, hitters were retired on strikes 21.6 percent of the time…and yet, they just kept coming to the plate! Self-talk for me sometimes consists solely of this: make the effort.

-Every game, like every day, is unique. You never know what to expect when you show up at the ballpark. Isn’t it nice to be surprised?!

Spring has never been the same for me since my husband introduced me to the joys of baseball. I’m hoping for a season reminiscent of 2010, 2012 and 2014, but baseball being baseball, this year might turn out like last year! As long as we frequently BEAT LA, I’ll be happy!

Cheers,

Michele

 

The Calla Lilies are in Bloom Again

IMG_6031
This beauty just appeared on the hill leading down to my shed! The pure white color of the Calla Lily makes it a popular choice for both weddings and funerals.

“The calla lilies are in bloom again. Such a strange flower — suitable to any occasion. I carried them on my wedding day, and now I place them here in the memory of something that has died.”

Dear Reader:

Katherine Hepburn spoke that line in The Lake, a long-forgotten play. I adore listening to her let the words roll off her tongue in her stylistic Mid-Atlantic accent, and, indeed, the line’s iambic pentameter sounds wonderful spoken in my California accent, too.

If you are a close reader, you are wondering how I’m able to hear her words. Let me tell you the story; it’s a great one! You see Katherine, it seems, was as tough as the characters she became famous for playing in her films.

The Lake was both a critical and popular flop. The same critics who had lauded Hepburn’s work in films wrote that the stage had exposed her to be lacking in great talent. Dorothy Parker famously said that her performance “ran the gamut of human emotion from A to B.” On top of that, the play was directed by Jed Harris, who was an infamous “big bad wolf” of American theatre. He was known for his abusive behavior to actresses (sound familiar?!). Harris intended to take the show on the road as he had sunk all his money into it. Hepburn, who was desperate to leave the play, wrote him a check for her life savings (around 14,000 dollars) and was released from her contract. She later said the experience was an important lesson in accepting responsibility for her own career.

Four years later, Hepburn was cast in Stage Door, a film about several aspiring actresses living together in a boardinghouse and competing for the same role in a play. The fictional play within the film prominently features the calla-lily- line. The director, Gregory La Cava, lifted it from The Lake Hepburn’s character practices it in rehearsal over and over, always without much feeling. But in the movie’s tragic climax, she memorably delivers the line with great emotion. Following the success of Stage Door,  that line became one of Hepburn’s signature catchphrases. She had turned her famous flop into a testament to tenacity. Now, that’s a strong woman.

hqdefault

They say that every person has a story to tell. It seems to me that every flower has something to say, as well!

Michele

P.S. Unfortunately, the elegant calla lily is poisonous; I do not let the puppy roam the hill as she is still in the “everything and anything goes in my mouth stage”.